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Buzz = what you – the people – think

Tell me what you find most frustrating about career development.

For instance;

  • Are you sure you are in the right job?
  • Would you like to change careers but can’t?
  • Are you able to get interviews?
  • Are you getting interviews for jobs you really want?
  • How many interviews convert into job offers and are you getting enough job offers?
  • Are you suffering from ageism?
  • What about interview nerves?

MartinI will reply to as many questions as I can.

Thanks
Martin

1,851 Comments

  1. laura

    I have been in retail/customer service for about 10 years. I started at 16 so with no experience you don’t really have a choice. I went to college got my associates in CJ and realized I don’t want to be a C.O or police officer, and wished I had some professional guidance before graduating. Now I am waitress and I and desperately need a career. I want to find a company I can grow with and have adult things like benefits, vacation days, etc. I am overwhelmed by all the information about resumes, jobs, entry level, etc. I feel like my only option would be in sales, and I cannot do that. The thought of my paycheck being dependent on harassing people to buy something is awful. I just don’t have that personality. I wish I could just find someone who would tell me what career I would enjoy, because this is EXHAUSTING.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Hi Laura,

      It’s complicated for sure. This is why I break it down into three steps.

      The hardest step of all is step 1 – “what were you simply born to do?”

      It looks like you have already came across some deal breakers. With a little help you should be able to refine this down into something you can use, making your choices much more obvious and clearer.

      Reply
  2. gina

    I am feeling lucky that I have a job at all and it is well paying and somewhat stable but I’m not loving it. I spend my days waiting for them to be over, living for the weekend and having anxiety sunday night when I have to return to work. My self confidence is low at this point and I’m just feeling lost and unsure of where to go from here.

    Reply
  3. Emily T.

    I applied for a job and was told to ask questions after my application was received. I don’t want to make that many mistakes.

    Reply
  4. Adele

    I’m a 16 year old girl and im really worried about my future because im really unsure on what i want to be when im older. I feel under pressure and feel like a need to know what i want to do as i am going to college at the end of this year and need to pick my courses for college very soon. I have some idea of what courses i want to do which include a-level psychology and a-level English language, but im not sure what jobs these courses will get me in the future. Im not really certain on whether i want to go to university yet, but i think i want to go down the psychology route because i find it very interesting, would i be able to do a psychology based job without going to university? Please would you give me some advice?

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Hi Adele,

      You are being asked to make some huge decisions with the minimum amount of information. No wonder you are unsure.

      My son is just about to turn 16, so we are dealing with the same issues at home.

      I got it really wrong at 16 and ended up with a degree in physics. It sure delighted my parents but I bloody hated every minute.

      You need to be clear about your objectives. Is your objective to get a degree or to find your dream job doing something you love?

      Degrees used to guarantee you a job. I’m not sure that’s the case any longer. Tertiary education is big business, so I would be asking some tough questions like, “what percentage of graduates from this course actually got a job in this profession?” I think you will be horrified at the answers you get.

      I spoke to a graduate recently who confirmed that less than 2% got into their profession with the other 98% working in bards and call centres.

      I find a lot of young people are going to Uni because they can’t think of an alternative. I’m not sure that’s a good enough reason.

      Reply
  5. Greg

    Interested in knowing when the updated version is available.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Some places will be released in February. Watch for an email about it.

      Reply
  6. Margaret

    Your assesment of me was right on track. Thank you

    Reply
  7. Doug

    I am over 50 years old. I have had two 15+ years jobs but both companies closed their doors. I do not think I can work for any one anymore. I have the mindset to be my own boss if I could just find out what career would fit me and if I could make a living doing it. Any suggestions?

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Doug, Thanks for raising an important point.

      When I talk about your “dream job”, it also encompasses self employment.

      There lots of people who work for themselves and are very happy. There are also lots of people who work for themselves who are not happy.

      Whether you are employed or self employed has no baring on whether something is your ideal job. This is only the contractual element and the least relevant.

      It maybe that starting your own business is the right thing for you. But maybe not. The process of identifying your ideal job is the same regardless of the contractual element. It takes time and thought and a fair bit of support to get you there.

      The second point you raise is about ageism, which is rife. The bad news is that if you are using traditional job hunting techniques, you are going to suffer ageism in a big way.

      THe good news is that there is an alternative approach to job hunting, which will get you around it. That’s what I cover in the 3 Step System.

      Reply
  8. Doreen

    I have been doing temporary jobs over the last 6 months and have several interviews but no luck! I desperately need to reassess my options, find a job asap/retire/invest in property ???

    Reply
  9. Terry

    I am lucky in that over the years I have had dream jobs, jobs that paid extremely well and other jobs that were awful, wet, dirty and cold and expected 12 to 18 hours from you seven days a week for months at a time. During that time I made sure that I absorbed as much information as possible and became skilled in about twelve main disciplines, all related and required on most projects around the world. Learning gave me the chance to be more employable as I could manage teams of people within these disciplines and consequently found myself being recruited for jobs in Africa, the Middle East, Korea, Japan and Hong Kong.
    Even now as I wind down my working life I find that I still receive offers of work but i’m resisting the chances as the pleasure isn’t there anymore.
    However, the important thing is to increase your chances by investing in training in as many different areas that you can but make sure they are all related and in your preferred field.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Terry, Thanks for sharing. I really appreciate it.

      As someone who has spent an unhealthy amount of time in training, I agree that it certainly helps.

      What I am finding however is that it’s not sufficient, simply because the recruitment process is deeply flawed.

      The good news is that most people can accelerate their careers by learning how, not by learning more. I believe most people could be a lot further forward with their existing qualifications and experience.

      A lack of ability is not the problem. It’s a lack of career development skills that’s the problem.

      Reply
  10. Lynda

    Martin I have just read your response to the maths teacher considering going back into éducation – it is a revelation. I have worked for 17 years in industry and particularily enjoyed the training side of my work. After redundancy, I retrained and moved into teaching, it has almost killed me. I love the worldwide with the children and contact with the families ( was In Customer service before) but find the School environment and management style very difficult to handle. The school I am in is known for being very difficult but I suspect that my disatisfaction stems from a desire to teach but not necessarily in a formal educational setting. In fact I handed in my notice yesterday and am now evaluating my options. A bit scary, as I have just turned 50!

    Reply
  11. Marc

    2 years after leaving the UK equivalent of WallStreet, and being a stay at home dad raising my kids… I am stuck as how to approach career change and even what I am good at. I feel now is the time to change course and find true work happiness.

    Reply
  12. Sarah

    I have been working in Higher Education – support side rather than teaching, was made redundant and have had some interviews, however where I have problems is that the last role that I had involved working across the University and heavily with ‘external’ organisations and in interviews I find that many Universities are still myopic, do not work outside of their own area/faculty and do not respond to change. So how do I get them to look at a different approach, enable change, work together and work with ‘external’ organisations – I give examples of how it has worked and the benefits, but all I seem to get, is Oh No, it’s just for our school, or our group ….. So very frustrating.

    Reply
  13. momtaz f chowdhury

    I get new jobs which is feeding my career/self well.
    But often suffer from wishing I could make my investors invest in future especially in people more.Often I find lack of ability to integrate this simple value in organization’s vision-mission-value-strategies.
    I am in the for profit-non profit for more than 32 years.

    Reply
  14. Josie

    I’ve just had the probation of my latest job ended and I will need to leave after my notice period. I can recognise how hugely important personality is – likely to having the right job but also fitting in the company.

    It’s a tough one and now I’m reconsidering my options. It’s especially difficult because the places that I been most successful seem to be disappearing – that is journalism is to some extent on the way out.

    I look forward to the next stage of this process!

    Thank you

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Journalism in the traditional sense maybe declining, but there are more people making a living from writing content today than there have ever been.

      Look for the evolutions.

      Reply
  15. Julia

    Hi Martin
    I been out of work for a while after bring up the kids , I getting bored and just want to find a job that will be rewarding however its not easy.
    People sterotype .

    Reply
  16. Julia

    Hi
    I feel part of the problem is getting my photo id done, and also the interview so many people going for the same job.

    Reply
  17. Su Howker-Whyte

    I love my job – but (there’s always a but…)
    Our organisation had a re-structure a couple of years ago. My options accept a lower grade with pay protection for a couple of years…or..move out. As I am nearing the end of my working life….’?0’… I am finding it increasingly difficult to deliver training sessions (boring I know but arthritis in my knee….)

    Over the last few years I have supported many projects and I believe that I could do as good a job if not better than some of the project managers…before becoming an IT Trainer I was an Admin organiser/Facilitator….

    My problem is ME….I get the interviews – do quite a bit of research to prep…but never manage to get it right – miss the point – don’t pick up on what they are really looking for…haven’t any projections for taking ‘it’ to the next level….now I think….someone younger…..fitter……could be what they are looking for….never mind skills and knowledge…..

    It would be my ideal to be able to develop training using new technology and delivering from my office….mobile technology, webinars, conference learning etc…..but…there is no training budget to help me upskill and I am not sure that I can justify paying all that money for myself for such a short term return on investment.

    Plus I just get so nervous at interviews – I can deliver training to auditoriums full of people, group sessions, 1-2-1 etc…but put me in front of an interview panel….arrggghhhh

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Su, thanks for sharing.

      It sounds like you do need a change, even if it’s being forced upon you by a dodgy knee. (i’ve got one of those).

      As regards interview nerves, you are not alone. There are many comments from people with similar issue. People like you who are extremely competent, yet struggle with interviews.

      However Step 3 of the 3 Step system will show you a brand new way of dealing with interviews – a psychological approach that you will love.

      Reply
  18. Lisa

    I’m not sure I’m in the right job. I’ve tried some different things and had some successful interviews, but some not successful interviews as well.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Lisa, If you are not sure, then you are not in your dream job. It’s a bit like love in that regard.

      Reply
  19. Rebecca

    Hi Martin
    I came out of teaching 5 years ago to take care of my dad who has Parkinsons Disease. I have two children 8 and 9. I am a single mother 41yrs. I got extremely anxious towards the end of my career and ended up seeing a counsellor. Stressed didn’t seem a strong enough word to describe how I was feeling. I used to be an amazing, talented, fun teacher. I ended up a shouty, useless, disorganised mess. I could retain 30+ children’s maths programs in my head and knew which steps to take next for every child. My brain was working so efficiently I was buzzing with excitement and thought I was the best teacher there ever was. 9 years later I had two wonderful children and this is where my brain power declined. I was tired, I argued with my partner as he was a useless, irresponsible liar and I couldn’t teach and be a mum.
    Now they are older, I have got some of my enjoyment back for teaching maths to my own but I am worried I will turn into that over anxious, hyper, disorganised mess I ended up being, if I was to go back. I vowed I would never teach again.
    Every day I think of what else I could do. I am desperate to earn my own money instead of relying on my dad to help me (i receive nothing from my ex)
    I can cook, socialise extremely well, I love computers and films ( I know these are hobbies). The list is pretty endless of what I can do and am capable of but the issue I am having is finding one solid idea (other than teaching) and sticking to it, and making a go of it. I want the best choice and I don’t know which that is. There is always a problem when I look into it in my mind. I do believe working in a team would be a great motivation for me as I struggle to motivate myself.
    I’d adore to go to work being excited and productive every day, like I used to…I’d be the last to leave. I was a perfectionist but I also have slight dyslexia so it would take me twice as long to do any planning. I was better just doing it off the top of my head.
    PLEASE HELP. I think your book might be the best thing Ive ever read to hold on to an option and see it through.
    Thank you for letting me blab on.
    Becs

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      THanks Rebecca, you speak for many thousands of people here.

      I have conducted a lot of research into work environment and here’s something I’m pretty convinced of.

      “Schools are not a conducive environment for natural teachers.”

      Nearly all natural teachers, start to hate teaching after working in schools for a few years. However what you need to distinguish between is “teaching” and “teaching in schools”.

      In terms of personality, schools require a personality type more commonly found in security work. I suspect most teachers have a different personality.

      If you feel the calling to teach, then you should teach. Just don’t do it in a school. There are millions of people who teach who never go near a school. I suspect this may be the direction your solution lies.

      Reply
  20. joanne moore

    Hi Martin
    I have change my career several times

    Although I have always managed to do well interviews and get most of the jobs I want.

    I always apply for the same skill base jobs, so I stick with what safe, but I love learning and trying something new

    I enjoy learning and being creative, but I seek the safe, familiar and even the boring

    I enjoy helping and inspiring others, but can’t seem to help myself or inspire myself
    I enjoy teaching self-confidence and personal development, but have rubbish self-esteem issues myself.
    I enjoy working as part of a team, but need time on my own to reflect
    I enjoy helping other to change their lives, but hesitate doing for myself, as change can frighten me
    I find that once I am in a new job. I have a willingness to learn and put myself forward for new ideas and projects, I am a very creative person who is willing try new ideas, especially if it will benefit the team or someone else to change in a positive way and in a way that they wish and is self-empowering, but I am fearful of getting it wrong.
    At the same time I become frustrated at others, usually other team members, and their lack or unwillingness to try something new. This is the way we have always done it becomes the mantra, even when it is not working. So I give in and conform.
    These dichotomies IN ME, frustrates me and is irksome to me. I feel like I repeat the same mistakes over, over and over again
    I have checked my personality type and it is INFJ
    I WOULD LOVE to UNDERSAND MYSELF and HELP MYSELF.
    I don’t appear to practice what I teach and believe

    I

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Hi Joanne, This is quite natural and it’s a good thing to want to provide service.

      There is a natural law that drives us to teach what we need to learn.

      There is another natural law that sees us attracts students that help us develop.

      Great coaching doesn’t come from a place of superiority but from a common bond.

      My uncle was a headmaster (old school) and a wise man. He believed that we should teach what we have just learned as it’s the only way that the knowledge sinks deep enough.

      In terms of human evolution, this is how we developed. Adults taught teenagers. Teenagers taught younger kids. Young kids taught infants.

      Reply
  21. BMadoff

    Hopefully this will help me find out the best career choice for me.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      It should do more than that. It should help you find your dream job; something that fills you with passion.

      Reply
  22. Rachel

    I have a reasonably well-paid job, with convenient terms and conditions, and I am a single parent, so I am holding out until my daughter goes to university.

    I don’t apply for many jobs, but when I do, I usually get through to first and second interview – because I only apply for jobs for which I know I have the relevant qualifications and experience (International sales and marketing). The last job application was a close-run thing, but the feedback I received was that I was ‘less dynamic’ than the other finalist.

    I don’t think that I’m not a dynamic person, but I am someone who tends to get on with things without a lot of fuss and that can come across as not being particularly ‘excited’ about work. I suppose I feel I’ve seen most of it, done it and got the T shirt already.

    So, when my daughter leaves home, I will pursue my ‘dream’ job, which will have little to do with sitting behind a desk writing strategies and more to do with being outside, working with horses and damaged people. Now that would be exciting!

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Thanks Rachel,

      First point – ignore feedback about not being dynamic- They talk through their A*se.

      Second point – Go for it. Don’t settle. I’ll help.

      Reply
  23. Chloe

    Letting go of fear and just going for it, or what could be.

    Reply
  24. Mabel

    I think I’ve lost confidence in my ability to cope in my dream job, and this comes across at interviews. Instead of concentrating on the things i can do, i’m too focused on all the things I am not sure I can do.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Mabel, you are not alone and I have helped many people in this scenario. I have about thirty videos dedicated this aspect alone.

      The good news is that we can change this for you.

      Reply
  25. Reem

    I attend one interview and I think because I am too enthusiastic that they felt I need the work desperately. In addition to having non-uk experience as well as a short gap make the chances of getting jobs rare in spite of studying 2 master degrees in constriction management and structural engineering.

    Reem Ayash

    Reply
  26. Haley

    Time and money are two of the biggest frustrations for me with career development and not knowing what to focus on.
    I do have a part-time administration job on a very low level of authority as part-time, I am a wife, mum and housekeeper. I have been doing this sort of job since leaving college and have never really known what ‘career’ I wanted so I guess i just settled for having a job that covered the bills. Since going back to work after Maternity leave I realised that this is no longer enough for me and I think I want to be self-employed/out of that job but as what I’m not sure but now I have to bring enough money in to match what I currently earn…I want to earn money through Writing, Reiki & am considering work with Avon but there is only so much time outside of childcare and we can’t afford a loss in money coming in.
    There is a qualification I want to do which will cost time and money to get it which I’m not sure I have….so a lot of worry and lack of confidence added to the mix which doesn’t really help with the creativity process….plus less energy as getting less sleep from all the different worries ….blah, blah, blah…where. oh where do I start to move on…it doesn’t help that lots of people still seem to think that us part-time working mums have it so easy as we ‘only’ do a few days at work (never mind all that we do at home …but we don’t get paid for that!) plus there are no real opportunities at work and when I’ve tried to make changes in my current role I have been told just to focus on the job and worry about different roles later…argh! Apologies for my rant there…it’s all so frustrating but I try to be positive ….

    Reply
  27. Tushar Chanchani

    Because I am too upfront.

    Reply
  28. queen

    I think my reason is my. Confidence, I have grand. Ideas but no real support. In getting them started. Also funding this for. The ideas that are not so out of the box is a major. Factor. Which does have an impact as I cannot take control of me andmy dreams or find a platform willing to support or should I say invest in me. So I am that worker who is half in and half out, I have passion and want to do well but boardom setsin and I want to free myself.but the trap is without real and secure finance, investment of confidence, trusted others outside the. Schemes trying to fleece u I am left. In a situation of. Only dreaming of what could possibly be. Knowing deep down with the. Right person, funding and or confidence, being the lest of my problems, I would. Actually be. Good at what did. But the combination of others doutes and riducle has it’s mark. After a while so… Dreams become just that and those after a while become a faint and distant memory.

    Reply
  29. Tony

    I think that among the reasons why I am unsuccessful are :
    1. ageism,
    2. lack of formal qualification (being addressed, but I need another 2 and a half years to complete),
    3. over qualification in terms of life skills ( I speak three languages fluently, plus a smattering of a further two, I am also a member of Mensa, and have high IT skills)
    4. lack of market opportunity (ie insufficient jobs at the right salary level).
    5. location – I am not in a position to relocate, so am hampered by this constraint also. I currently commute 33 miles each way to a job I hate in a company I am not happy with.

    Reply
  30. Ruth

    Up to the age of 40, I seemed to be able to get any job I wanted. When I next applied for jobs after the age of 43, none of my applications even merited a reply.

    Reply
  31. sam

    RACISM

    Reply
  32. Kenneth

    For sure the major comment I can see, as a person of 58 years, is that I seem to be over-experienced for most positions. It is really saying that I am too old. I had a recent experience that has confirmed this. One agency sent my details to a company in Portugal and the usual comment of “over experienced” came back. Some time after I was contacted by another agency for the same position stating that the company was asking them for “more experienced” candidates to be forwarded to them. I really question what criteria HR in these companies use for “more experienced”.

    Reply
  33. Chris Taylor

    The reason I can’t land my dream job is simple…..it’s a very small specialised area. Road risk and cognitive development and understanding of drivers hasn’t latched on yet in the UK to how important these subjects are, and employers tend to put any type of development and training at the back of their priorities. I also believe the cognitive development could also be transferred to the entire warehouse and distribution system.
    I would relish a full time position in the Occupational Road Risk field, although I have been a Road Risk Officer assisting with the development of a Management of Occupational Road Risk system and policy, my perfect position would be to develop the training in this area, not only the courses but also the trainers, in this area the correct trainers are crucial.

    Reply
  34. Rosemary

    The 1st thing stopping me find my dream job is that I don’t know what it would be. The 2nd is that there is a specific list of requirements e.g. I was interested in a job recording students marks that involved liaising with staff. I love students and liaising and, I have a lot of skills in managing data but, they wanted an NVQ2 or above in Business and Administration. I only have a M.Sc in Engineering. So that ruled me out.

    Reply
  35. Angela

    Hi Martin

    I have been with recruitment agencies for 12 years now and I find they compete me against other candidates within their agency which I think is unfair. I feel totally demoralized in admin work and want to try something different but dont know how or what will suit me. I am scared it wont work out or I will hate the change. I want to either be a helicopter pilot, work in TV or media or run my own business. I have had issues with work place bullying and I put a barrier up whenever I start a new job. Social anxiety then gets in the way of me showing my potential and its been happening for a couple of years now. I dont know where to start to make my life of work a reality.

    Reply
  36. Paul Gibbin

    I have worked in retail management for over ten years working in fast paced high pressure environments. I find myself needing to find anew position, however most of the time I get a reply stating that my resume / CV doesn’t match the exact profile required by the recruiter. A couple of interviews I have been to I have got the sense that there has been something wrong from the start, and have been bold and asked the question, “Is it that I may be too old?” and on two occasions the reply has been yes, with a very quickly added, “you may be too experienced”. Whether there is an ageist attitude these days I do not know, I work hard, very energetic and hands on style, long hours don’t bother, but still these younger managers that are recruiting must feel afraid of the older person wanting to come in to their domain. Are they really that insecure or probably just inadequate ?

    Reply
  37. Charlene Tang

    My only dream job is owning my business which is what i am about this year. I am into Events Management and, in my country, if you not a in a particular circle, you got to start from scratch because no one is willing to assist.

    What has prevented me before,………simply put, fear. I now getting over that fear and moving along.

    Reply
  38. Jackie

    My dream job would be working in an environment where I made people laugh. I would like to encourage and empower people and concentrate on all that is great about them and help them to develop self confidence and belief.
    Currently I’m in a rut at work and realise I have been in this particular job for too long and my confidence in my abilities has diminished. I’m good at what I do but have no real motivation as I’m largely ignored and not appreciated at all.
    Outside of my paid job, I started stand up comedy 2 years ago and absolutely love it, I was created to do it, I just know it. Ideally I would love to go into an area of television or training where this creative talent would be useful.
    So not asking for much I hear you cry.

    Reply
  39. Eric

    What is my dream job, I have spoken to sooo many agencies and specialists that have cost me a fortune; I have had my CV tweaked by experts who promise interviews – rubbish, that is all I can say! I am in a similar position to Alwyn, too experienced and too many years on the clock and no idea of what to do to get off this treadmill where I travel for 4 to 5 hours a day and have no time to see my children.

    Reply
  40. Adrian Dean

    Hi Martin

    I think the economic climate in the UK is preventing me from seeking a change or progression. Added to that I suppose I’ve been a bit lazy and lacking in ambition. I suppose in a bit of a rut. Currently I feel undervalued at work and feel my position is under threat as we are going through a restructure where there are less posts available than people, whether this is deliberate tactic by the organisation to drive pay down and keep staff on ‘their toes’ I’m unsure. This does give your confidence a bit of a bashing. So you could say at tthe moment I’m trying to hang on to what I’ve got rather than looking elsewhere.

    Regards
    Adrian

    Reply
  41. Wanda

    Being unemployed and over a certan age in the current markert makes getting any job a dream. I apply for jobs, but rarely get a response.

    Reply
  42. Alwyn

    Being unemployed in today’s economic climate seems like getting any job is a dream – never mind a dream job. My biggest hurdles are age and experience – I have too much of both and get screened out at an early stage, usually without a response.

    Reply
  43. gian

    I want to try it.

    Reply
  44. Ruhi

    Hi, its heartening to see I have company. After seeing some of the comments, I feel I’m not the only one! I feel kind of stuck in my career as I want a change from the usual auditing, accountancy and taxation work which I have been doing in the last 15 years,but would like to use these skills with doing something different. Don’t know what would be satisying yet provide a source of income. I really enjoy aromatherapy, alternative methods of healing like reiki,spirituality and self development. Is there a way to develop a career and incorporate all the interests.

    Reply
  45. Rosheen Arthur

    Actually knowing what my dream job or at least my dream direction is what is holding me back. I am good with working towards goals. Im still (with distractions) working through your what is my dream job is right for me and while accurate and with good insights and clarification of my personally im still lost.

    Reply
  46. Jo

    Like many people its is fear, my fear is around my dyslexia. As a senior manager I often spend 3X as long on admin work and even them it can have grammar mistakes unfortuanetly it is a comptetive world and when you get to a certain level people expect good grammar. I worked long and hard to try ot minimise the issue but there is only som much i can do to cover up my weaknesses.

    Reply
  47. chris

    I have always done the right thing for my family and others and find it very hard to place myself first. I have never really ever seen my true road and wonder if that is a dream only a hand full of lucky people ever get to enjoy.
    I am seeking to turn my self doubts around with positive thoughts but 1 step forward always leads but to my starting point over time.
    Yes I would open myself up to any opportunities that could lead to a brighter future.

    Reply
  48. Beata

    Hi Martin,

    Just a question to add to my first comment – when I replied to your ‘Early Bird’ notification email about “The 3 Step System…” ed. 5, a pop-up window came up with a confirmation message which suggested I replied quickly enough, and today I’ve received an e-mail saying the Early Bird offer is closed. This leaves me a bit confused – please could you clarify whether I’ve managed to get on the early Bird list or not?

    Many thanks in advance.

    Reply
  49. Steve

    I have now come to believe my biggest barrier to getting the right job is myself.
    Being over 50 and unemployed for 2 years now does not help, and effects positive self belief, esteem and everything else that goes with it.
    Not earning for so long has meant the I can no longer pay for courses to upgrade my skill set to make me more attractive to potential employers.
    Being depressed about what seems like everything does not make me the best person to be around, and if truth be known I would not employ myself at the moment.

    Reply
  50. Beata

    The type of work I am after is perfectly ‘doable’ on a part-time basis and from anywhere as long as you can use a computer. However, the vast majority of jobs I’ve looked at are full time only and stuck in the office all day. I need flexibility.

    Reply
  51. Alex

    I pretty much have the best job I’ve ever had .. and the others were not bad either. I’m not sure why I’m on this mailing list in fact !

    Reply
  52. otilia

    Hi Martin,
    Before, my dream job was working in the Travel and Tourism Industry but I didn’t quite got there due to my lack of hands on experience in the Travel Agency and to be honest I don’t like the pressure to perform for target. Later, I wanted to work as a cabin crew or PSA but the interview process was really fierce so several unsuccessful attempts at the selection process I gave up despite I did a Cabin Crew course. Lately I have applied to do a Dental Nurse course but my application was unsuccessful.
    At the moment my dream job would be to have my own business because I am pretty much a people person and i would work damn hard to make my business up and running well. Thank you.

    Reply
  53. Lynn Whittle

    My early working career was in childcare. I loved it, enjoyed the work and looked forward to learning new skills to use. The pay was bad, but on balance, the job was my dream job. Then I became disabled and unable to give safe duty of care to my charges. I became unemployed at 45 years of age. This was before all the Government help that got pushed at 16-25 year olds, apprenticeships and graduates’, 6 month post graduation jobs.
    I am in the process of sitting a degree myself, as it seemed the most sensible route, after I got ousted from a voluntary job due to the last Government scheme.
    So now, I will be a 55/56 year old graduate with disabilities and a need for prescriptive working conditions. Qualifications but no experience-(story of my life). Not a good start to a new career. I am also very overweight, deaf and have asthma, alongside my mobility problems.
    Do I need say more?

    Reply
  54. Paula Page

    Dear Martin,
    I got your three sage system and personality programe to help me discover my perfect job. I am now doing it, and loving every minute. Sadly I don’t get paid because its voluntary work, but Hay! money is not everything. Although the course did not put me with the financal highflyers it did help me sort out what was important to me in my life and for me that is very important. In this world very few poeple get paid at the top rates for doing a job they truely enjoy. Thats why customer service in this country is so poor.

    Reply
  55. Clara Sachslehner

    I myself: My fear and my (negative) thoughts.

    Reply
  56. Tania

    I go outside the box, keep ahead of developments, refuse to give in to ageism, keep myself fit and healthy, offer up improvement suggestions, work at a rate of knots….no-one else seems to be on the same page and treats my job and level as though “any monkey can do it”, so I am struggling to break the “apathetic, don’t know any different” barrier. People say they want improvements and efficiencies, but mostly that’s lip service when push comes to shove and do not see the value in what I do, as a result, I am underpaid, undervalued and feeling undermined.

    Reply
  57. Doreen

    My dream job would be overseas and therefore leaving my family behind, so seems not an option right now. I’ve had several interviews in the past few months but have not had any offers. Age could possibly be an issue, or I am not looking for the right roles, or not performing well at interviews.

    Reply
  58. David

    Despite the fact that I am in good shape physically and I have approaching 40 years experience in many diverse places, I have noticed that now I have reached 60 yrs of age no one seens interested in what I have to offer anymore.
    I have managed contracts as big as 23musd in such way out places as Congo, Darfur and North Korea but now ……

    I think recruitment agencies work from a tick list designed by people and committees who don’t understand the realities of overseas or even domestic workplaces – no ticks – no chance or interest.
    Ageism is rife

    Reply
  59. Sarah

    It is a whole mix of things for me, after my contract ended two years ago I have been applying for jobs alongside doing voluntary research, and working on building contacts through LinkedIn, organising telephone conferences to keep in touch, I am also caring for both of my elderly parents. I also feel that I am fighting ageism, so guess I also begin to doubt my ability.

    Reply
  60. Amber

    I am keeping myself from landing my dream job by not believing in myself. Not having the courage to go outside of the box and pursue what I really want. Though I often have the skills required, I keep telling myself that someone else more qualified will get the job, and it really slows down my motivation.

    Reply
  61. SamMo

    Got notice of redundancy last week from a job I’ve worked in for almost 4 years but never really enjoyed, whats holding me back mmmm well not sure exactly what it is that I want to do and have been getting a regular paycheck till now so have felt ‘safe’ now I need to work out how to maintain my income and get a new job while still trying to work out what I want to do. Am applying to employers for the sake of it and need to understand what I want to do so that I can focus my applications and then get a job I actually want to do.

    Reply
  62. Heather

    Martin,
    I know exactly what is keeping me from getting my dream job. I have no idea what my dream job is. I know what I’m good at, however I don’t know how to translate that into a job. So I’m stuck in a loop doing a little of what I like and a lot of what I don’t, and don’t know how to get out of the loop.

    It’s not fun when you can’t figure out where to begin…stuck in a loop and unable to move forward without moving backwards.

    Help would be greatly appreciated and desperately needed!!!

    Reply
  63. Ian Drury

    Hi Martin,
    Well for me it is having enough capital / money to actually set up my own business as at the moment this is totally out of my reach. I work part-time for a charity and love what I do but only earn just enough to pay the bills with no spare money to even consider a holiday or being able to save any spare cash as there isn’t any !
    Also my age is now against me .

    Reply
  64. Pat Mitchell

    Does being made redundant what seems like over and over again mean I should be self-employed?
    Pat

    Reply
  65. Paul Jones

    I think I am getting closer to my dream job. Thanks to the 3 step system, I have a thought long and hard about what interests me and the kind of tasks/jobs, which come naturally to me. I have become more aware that I have a specific set of skills, personality and experience that make me, me but I have reached that stage where I am finding very difficult to find exactly ‘which employers are out there’, who really, really need these skills and qualities. I remember Martin, you mentioned once that there is ‘a dream job out there’ for each and every one of us. And this is the problem, how to find that dream job or employer who is that perfect fit.

    Reply
  66. Stuart Clitherow

    Hi Martin, in answer to your question about what is preventing me from getting my dream job; I think I have the perfect storm in relation to success in the job market; one is almost certainly my age (I am 52). I am a very competent and experienced graphic designer, yet despite this I am often screened out before interview stage even when I think my qualifications and experience match the job description perfectly. I have of course questioned my initial presentation with my cover letter and CV. On at least one occasion interview nerves have let me down along with a lack of confidence. So even when I do make the final cut I have the distinct feeling that I have let myself down during the interview – from last interview I had in late November the feedback was that 1) I did not research the organisation thoroughly enough and 2) I took too long to get to the answers they wanted; this confirms my underlying feeling that my nerves are clouding my thought processes. I know that in my current freelance capacity that I do an excellent job for my customers and I am keen to translate this into interview success.

    Reply
  67. Jane

    Me!! Simply put. I need capital to do what i really love so my best option was to work and save up before starting out.

    Reply
  68. Alison

    Hi Martin,

    Firstly thank you, for helping me to see that everything is not lost. I took the questionnaire and I have just watched you very insightful video. I think I fall into all three reasons why people are not in their ideal job. I have ideas of what I would like to do (so at least that is a start), but at the moment I don’t believe my ideal job exists and if it indeed exists how you go about searching for something you can’t see or touch. From my report it indicates I like to be in an environment where I like to have clear measurable objectives and a clear process to achieve them…so to use your phrase I am all ‘at sea’ with job hunting. So my question to you is how do I get back onto ‘dry land’, as it were.

    Any help would be gratefully received.

    Kind regards,

    Alison

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Alison, thanks for getting in touch. You speak for a lot of people as this is a common issue.

      Believe it or not, you have already taken the first important step. Implementing the solution is a lot easier when you know a problem exists.

      Pretty sure I can help.

      Reply
      • Alison

        Hi Martin,

        Thank you so much for getting back to me.

        I have just watched your next video part 3 – Interviews. Master the skill. Some great tips and a different way of looking at interviews. I think the most enlightening part of the video for me was, am I actually going for the right jobs. I think my personality type hasn’t and doesn’t quite match the job I am in or have been going for in the past and maybe the future. So I think I need to re-evaluate what it is I should be doing in order to get that dream job and not get stuck on this merry-go-round of jobs that maybe just aren’t for me, Sounds silly really, why would you go for a job that doesn’t suit you…

        I have read through some of the past comments on this page and I really think that this is the course for me. I understand you have very limited spaces, is this still the case?, if so do you have a waiting list or do you do one-to-one sessions?

        Kind regards,

        Alison

        Reply
  69. Samar

    It is a very good course and I would advise people to go through it in order to help themselves

    Reply
  70. Tricia

    So, I have this history of being very competent and forming very strong relationships at work that last long after I’ve moved on. However, I am never satisfied with the job I’m doing for the long term. None of the jobs seem to come with the soulfulness and involvement that I’m looking for. Sure, there is honor and dignity in doing any job well, but when your heart isn’t in it, there always seems to be something missing. I’ve determined that the difference lies in having an occupation rather than a profession. I have been stuck in occupations my whole life, so I went back to school in order to engineer a professional career but can’t seem to get the opportunities I need to grow my professional life. I have no idea what direction to turn in. I’m hoping that your information can help me identify career options that will enable me to finish the 2nd half of my career in a way that is meaningful to me. Looking forward to seeing what information shows up in my email inbox!

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Hi Tricia, It sounds like you are suffering what most smart, competent people suffer. The challenge you face is that it takes more than technical competence for something to resemble your ideal job. It has to resonate with your core personality. Matching skills and activity will only ever take you so far. You have to match the psychology if you really want to feel the difference.

      Reply
  71. Mike

    I have been in the same job role for over 17 years and have always followed my mind’s suggestion not to take any truly focused action to make a change. The reality of job dissatisfaction hit me very hard recently causing me to realise I had completely lost sight of what I actually want, I am hoping that the information you provide will finally help me to find a way to break through and move on. The feedback from the short assessment was very enlightening and has helped me to understand what I need to do to put things right.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Mike, It sounds like you have had a rough time of it recently. I would love to help you find a breakthrough and direction again. Pretty sure we can achieve that.

      Reply
  72. Brian

    Good stuff Martin! I agree completely with the idea of finding a job that fits your personality. I am a bit skeptical of finding it based on these sorts of tests. You are a good Scot like my Nana though, God rest her soul, so I’m willing to give it a shot.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Thanks Brian. Was it my accent that gave it away 🙂

      Reply
  73. D C

    The personality profile report was accurate and described, for my surprise, what I want from an work environment. Looking forward for next steps!

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Thanks Daniela. Most people are surprised by the accuracy of it.

      Reply
  74. Amber

    Hi Martin, I’ve only watched the first video and you’ve got me hooked. Looking forward to more. Thanks!

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Thanks Amber. I think you will like what I have to show you. THere is stuff in here that they don’t want you to know about.

      Reply
  75. Paul

    Day 1…

    Help me !!!

    I’m drowning in self doubt and wallowing in a state of de-motivation.

    I do know what I need though – guidance and an idea of what I can apply my current skill-set and personality to. I’ve been too long in a very narrow profession and can’t see a way out.
    Roll on video 2.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Paul, I appreciate you sharing this. Many people feel the way you do. However you are already taking action, which is the surest way to overcome self doubt and to tap into your motivation.

      Reply
  76. Karen

    whoa, typing not my strong point! After watching the first video and only answering 5 questions i was astounded at how you picked up on a core trait of mine – its not personal only business and my need to work in quiet environment, now i can see why the last 10 years have been so tough to get through. I look forward to the next clip.

    Reply
  77. Chris

    Hi Martin,
    I’ve only watched the first video so far but have found it surprisingly accurate and already it has given me a lot to think about.
    Looking forward, with excitement, to the rest.

    Thank you,

    Chris.

    Reply
  78. H Carey

    Really enjoying the videos Martin. Although I find it all a bit scary as I’ve never had any interviews in the last 20 years!!!

    One thing that interests me, in video 3 you talked about answering personality interviews questions. And you posed the example question, ‘Why is delegating so important?’. If an interviewer asked me that question, then I’d assume they want me to explain ‘delegating’. I don’t think I would interpret it as an opening to acknowledge that I’m weak at delegating and then talk about my corresponding strengths. However, if they asked me, ‘How do you feel about delegating?’ then maybe I would. Do you recommend interpreting the interviewer’s question (explaining what you think they’re asking for) before answering? Thanks.

    Reply
  79. Colette O Shea

    Hi Martin my name is Colette and I am unemployed at the moment after being in a job I liked and enjoyed for 8 and a half years but I didn’t enjoy the way the manager treated me. I have never known what I wanted to do ‘when I grew up’ but I do think that psychometric testing can help lead people in the right direction. I listened to your 1st video and look forward to more.

    Reply
  80. Dave

    I’ve done many psychometric tests and interviews in the past and found that I’ve been very successful, having a high rate of being offered roles. What I’ve found is that I’ve chased the role and money rather that what would make me happy, or finding that “dream job”, often answering tests and interviews with answers that I know that the interviewer is wanting to hear. What I find is that I land a “great” job and find myself very unhappy very quickly, struggle with the role and motivation, and before long find my self looking for another role. It’s interesting and liberating taking a good look at my personality, for the first time ever answering the tests honestly and being blown away by the insights I’m getting. Already I feel more comfortable in my current role without the torture of promising something that isn’t in-line with my personality and even more excited about the future that I’ll find…that is in line with my personality. Thank you Martin, looking forward to learning much more!

    Reply
  81. Sarah

    Your comments about interviewers wanting interviewees who know what they want rather than someone who is not sure about the role and is hoping the interviewer is will see something in them that will make them offer the interviewee the job struck a chord with me. As someone looking for a change of direction it can feel a bit like you are clutching at straws, pushing the doors of possibility in the hope that the right one will open, but not really being sure which the right one is. I would love to find out what my ideal job is so I can apply with conviction and certainty that this is where I want to be.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Thanks Sarah, glad you liked it. Happy to help where I can.

      Reply
  82. e

    So, after identifying that a strong team spirit is needed, what happens if the work you do seems to be right but the team and location are wrong. You don’t get to choose your own team and some people, especially in small teams, just do not share the same ideas / ethos.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Emma, It’s very true that the people we work with on a day to day basis form a large part of our work environment. Know what works best for you is the starting point. Only then will you notice when you need to make a change. And yes it may mean you have to find a new team elsewhere.

      A note of caution however. A good team has people from across the personality spectrum. You don’t want everyone being the same. A great team learns how to make differences work together. We all play our part in the team and we all have to take some responsibility for making it work.

      Reply
  83. Akansha

    I would to thank you. these psychometric are just truly awesome as they actually reflected my true character. i appreciate your effort. Thank you.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      You are very welcome Akansha.

      Reply
  84. Iliana

    Hello,

    I listened to your video yesterday and agree with everything you say. I have found what I want to do but I can’t make money from it with my current approach, I do recognize this is to do with confidence and lack of knowledge. Unfortunately I’m currently out of funds and need an income so I’m doing the cv approach, which isn’t working.
    I was offered a one off freelance project last night but as I haven’t worked freelance before I’m now struggling to cost it.
    I feel lost in the many options out there and was looking for a regular job to fund the job I want to do whilst I’m figuring out how to build that career and compete with people with better credentials than I have.
    I know I’m panicking, primarily because I need an income yesterday, I’ve also had some time out of the work force due to ill health which causes me a lot esteem issues.
    I have an interview on Thursday for an entry level job with the potential to move into my career field and it would be great to get it but my confidence is telling me I’m just a filler interview after having several interviews where I felt like filler interviewee.
    Any tips for interviewing?
    This is a brilliant thing for you to do, especially for as some people can’t fund things upfront but will pay when you help them get that job 🙂
    Anyway thank you.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Hi, I do include a lot of tips on how to convert every interview into a job offer. However I get the feeling you are turning up at the wrong interviews – most people do.

      I sense your panic but you need a clear head and you need to focus your energy in one area. It sounds like you need to make some decisions. It almost doesn’t matter what decision you make, as long as you commit to it. Only then will you see results. Deep breaths. Deep breaths.

      Reply
  85. Kevin

    I am very intrigued with the idea of finding my dream job. I don’t know what it is yet, but I’m hoping this content will be able to assist me.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Glad to help Kevin.

      Reply
  86. hope

    Martin,

    Keep up the good work. It is amazing how the psychometric tests that you implemented are a true and accurate reflection of my character.

    I hope and wish that i can follow the path that we discussed very soon.

    Reply
  87. hope

    Amazing Martin.The personality report is so true..It really did point out my strengths/ weaknesses.I am impressed.Keep up the good work. I can not wait for your next email towards this journey.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      You are very welcome.

      Reply
  88. Elizabeth

    Hi Martin

    First let me say how comforting the tone of your voice is. I have reached a stage in my life where I have got myself stuck on a treadmill. I have been in sales for 25 years and have always had an inner battle on knowing deep down ‘this is not for me’ when I say that is not because I have not been successful as I enjoy meeting different people and being out and about, and delivering a product to satisfy their needs. My inner battle is I am not using my ideas and you have hit the nail on the head. You are right I am bursting with ideas and bursting with ideas to write stories What stops me – others tell me it is a dream – others tell me you cannot make a living out of it, so I end up again in sales, getting to the adage ‘ if you always do what you have always done you will always get what you always got’ I feel I am in a trap. I so much look forward to listening to you soon and thank you for the first part of the course which is true of me but scary.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Elizabeth,

      Yes it’s a little scary. But you know what. Dreams never killed anyone. Before you kill a dream, play it out in your head.

      It’s clear that you are not satisfied with things at present, so you have to change them. However there is plenty you can do to reduce the risk and increase the predictability of the outcome, even when it starts off as a dream.

      Do the ground work. Only once you have done all the work should you consider implementing it and turning it from a dream to your reality. It sounds like you are killing off the dreams too quickly and too easily. Fight for it. Get into an argument with the friends who tell you you can’t make any money doing it and win the damn argument.

      And if you can’t win the argument then do more ground work. Tweak it till you can.

      Reply
  89. pooja

    thanku

    Reply
  90. hope

    Hi Martin,

    This is interesting. I would love to do the 3 step system course in order to see what type of career will match my personality. I am going through a self exploration journey and many options of jobs are coming up but I have not decided yet that this is the career/job I want to do.What is adding an interest to the existing process is that I am currently unemployed and try to build back my lost confidence in order to get back to the job market.As money is very tight I need to have a regular income that will give me more time space and freedom to decide what career I need to pursue.Any tips on that issue?
    Keep up the good work!

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Glad to help. It’s natural to lose a bit of confidence when job hunting.

      But do not take their rejection too personally. Mostly you are dealing with complete incompetents and amateurs, whose opinion isn’t worth noting. Best of luck.

      Reply
  91. hope

    Hi Martin,

    The first video was very useful indeed.I am currently unemployed and trying to figure out what my ideal job/career will be..While I am in the process of figuring this out my finances are very limited so I need a job to keep me going until I will figure out what I want to do with my career.
    Any tips on that?Will the interviewer appreciate the fact that I have a small employment gap on my CV?How can I show that in a positive way on my CV?
    Also would I be able to watch the next two videos about securing interviews and job offers from you?
    I am currently doing a computer course on my free time and some refresher driving lessons.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      The trick here is to move away from CV based recruitment. The 3 Step System will show you how to get job offers without a CV.

      When you rely upon CV based recruitment you are playing with a weighted dice and it’s all in the employers favour. You need to level the playing field.

      Reply
  92. Seb

    Hi Martin

    Very interesting. I’ve watched your first video, am watching your second (truth about the recruitment industry).

    I’m lucky enough to have saved enough money to have left my last job voluntarily, and to now be able to take a few months to think about my best next move.

    The very revolutionary thing I’ve got from your way of thinking so far is that the first step is to work out what I should be doing with my life. I think I had an inkling of this before, and it motivated me to look at my finances from a viewpoint of “can I afford to take a break?”, and then to leave a job that was not suitable for me.

    But I still feel pressure – from the expectations of people around me, and, I now think, from my own internalised habits of thinking – that I should be moving on as fast as possible, to any job. Now, that may have been true when I hit the job market at 18, or at 23: at that age, many things were the right things to do simply as experiments that gave me valuable experience to chew on. At age 41, when I know much better (but still not well enough) what I enjoy doing, and have a lower tolerance for blind alleys, the case is different.

    So my experience now chimes with much of what you say in your videos. No, I shouldn’t be out chasing interviews right now: I feel that if I did that, I’d effectively be “asking the interviewers to tell me what I should be doing with my life” (in your own, telling phrase). If I can spend time working this out for myself, then I can move on to the next stage, of actually looking for work, in a better way.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Seb, Don’t do it.

      Ignore what people are saying. Listen to your inner voice. It will tell you when you are making good decisions and bad ones.

      Often the logical sensible thing to do is not the right decision. The advice well meaning, people will give you usually looks sensible and logical but it’s rarely accurate.

      Find your true calling and chase that. Do not waste a life doing what others expect.

      Reply
  93. s

    thank you for being generous and for not quickly asking for billing accounts and stuff which is a major annoyance .

    Guess what , the only thing that keeps coming to my mind is vegitable and flower gardening and daycare for children and house for the elderly .

    Reply
  94. Emma

    Hey Martin,
    thanks for all the smart ideas. You said I should leave a comment so here it goes.
    I’m 27 and I work as an architect and I love it, I love the creativity, the theory and the actual building but:
    1. I find the office work itself extremly boring. I miss being around people, I miss the fun, the communication, the challenges. This might be solved by changing to a more lively firm, although
    2. I constantly feel that what I do is superfluous, that I want to help people and designing a pretty house for those who can afford it is not enough. I volunteer in social housing projects but still, I would like to do something more efficient to help. Back in the day I almost chose to study psychology or social work, and I am still very interested in those things, I read about them a lot, and it keeps bothering me that I made the wrong choice.
    I don’t know what to do, I feel as if I have two completely different personality in me. Should I quit architecture or should I ‘dig deeper’ in the social design field? I can’t imagine a job that combines all the things I like to do. Maybe I should do them simultaneously. Dunno.
    Anyway 🙂 Thanks if you answer.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Emma,

      How interesting. I love what I am reading here.

      I do not see this as you having a problem with architecture. However I see you have a problem with the usual routes that an architect follows. It sounds like you need to get creative in how you apply your skill and who you apply it for.

      I have a feeling you know what you want to do. I suspect it will still need your skills but the rewards will come in a different form.

      Spend some time brainstorming what this could look like. Give yourself permission to look outside of the box. You’re smart. You can figure this one out.

      DO NOT CONFORM – YOU DO NOT NEED TO !!!!!

      Reply
  95. Joanne

    I watched your video yesterday having done the test and must say that everything you said so far rings true. I was made redundant some months ago and since then have been getting interviews based n my cv but have come second every time so I feel that although I know I can walk the walk I obviously cannot talk the talk for interviews so I am hoping to pick up some good tips from your course. I feel I am in the right job

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Hi Joanne,

      Everyone sucks at interviews. Learn this skill and opportunities will open up to you. You don’t need to be that great at it to be better than everyone else.

      Your only concern is if you come up against another one of my clients 🙂

      Reply
  96. Louise M

    Hi Martin,
    I found your site yesterday and have read and listened closely! I was curious to explore your ideas as I am thinking about doing an MA this September in something that I think I have wanted to do for quite sometime, but would be love to feel more confident that I am making the right decision. Can you offer any advice about having confidence in life-changing decisions like this?
    Best wishes,
    Louise

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Hi Louise,

      Thanks for sharing. My main advice would be to ensure that your work environment is in harmony with your core personality. Make sure you are getting yourself into something that works with your personality.

      I started out in Physics. I hate details. Always have. I’m easily bored. Why the hell did I study physics ? Because I was a plonker.

      Think beyond the qualification. Look at how you will spend your days and with whom you will spend your days.

      Reply
  97. Ajith

    Hi,

    Many thanks for the assessment and comments, which I believe, I have to think over and over and then improve on by relaxing my stiff stance.

    Many thanks

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Great Ajith. Remember always be flexible in your approach.

      Reply
  98. Amy S.

    I am so excited to start this! I am a freshman in college and thought I had it all figured out. I came into college so sure of what I wanted to do and I don’t know now! I have so many ideas inside my head but no inkling of where to go from here. Help!

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Amy,

      You can never have too many ideas 🙂

      It’s good that you change your mind upon arriving at college. Let’s be honest we know nothing as school children. I did physics for God sake…… eejit me.

      Learn all you can about yourself and who you are. Then check that you are thrusting yourself into environments that suit.

      Me in a laboratory – that’s ridiculous.

      Reply
  99. SAMEER KOCHHAR

    HI Martin,

    I have taken your personality test and found that the things you have shared with me are correct. Now my problem is that I have been giving Interviews from last 3 months but could not make Anywhere. I have Work experience of 9 months only, I have done my B.E(CSE) in 2009 and MBA(Marketing) in 2011. So its 2 years from 2011 that I am yet not settled. I had worked with a Life Insurance company in Operations for 7 months and did not liked the kind of work I was doing there.
    Whenever a Job Opportunity comes in front of me I get confused whether I would be able to do it or not,WHETHER I should go for it, what would be the Profile. Now if some job opportunity comes for me particularly from Insurance, Sales,Banking I say just No to it. Then I think I am saying No to Everything so where is my Career going.

    PLEASE HELP ME AS I AM NOT SETTLED AND WILL BE 26 after 1 Month AND THIS THING IS GIVING ME TENSION VERY BADLY. KINDLY REPLY ON E-MAIL.

    Thanks.
    Sameer

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Sameer,

      Breath, breath, breath.

      OK.

      THe reason I developed the 3 Step System is because it takes you systematically through a process that answers the right questions in the right order. You are jumping back and forth and getting nowhere fast.

      Step 1 – Figure out what the hell it is you really want to do. What is your calling? What were you simply born to do?

      No point doing anything else till you figure this step out.

      Step 2 – Speak to some people that may eventually hire you. Also known as getting interviews.

      Step 3 – Convert every interview in to a job offer.

      Learn the master skill of interview technique and you will get a lot more job offers. Most people suck at interviews. If you stop sucking you will get more offers.

      Reply
  100. Jess

    What job shall I do and study at Uni? I want to help people. I want to travel. I like children. I don’t mind blood.I would enjoy working with disabled people. I would like a rewarding job. I want to work with people where I talk with people everyday. I would like to stimulate my brain a bit. I want my job to be varied. I like being outdoors. Please help me 🙂

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Jess.

      That’s a lot of questions.

      You have my head spinning almost as much as yours. Take the free training course and then come back to me with more specific questions. However I like how you are thinking.

      Ask for a lot, as you are in danger of receiving it.

      Ask for crap and you are in danger of receiving it.

      Reply
  101. Josie

    I don’t know if I am in my dream job now, I certainly enjoy it (90% of the time) I am supposedly the boss (which I like) but my husband / business partner stifles me. Not looking for marriage guidance, although that is probably all I need! –
    I adored my first job of being a shop unit development manager (2 yrs until the recession (1st recession) hit). Then I worked fairly happily as a nurse (12 yrs), I trained as a secretary (which I hated every minute of and only stuck it for 2 yrs) then took a degree in microbiolgy and worked in a lab for 15 yrs. I liked the work but hated the job (if that makes sense). If I could have done it in my kitchen at home I would still be doing it! I think I am fairly good at sticking at things, even if I don’t like them, but last August I started up a reclamation business and I love it, but already I am thinking I need to move on. I know I need to be my own boss/ organising my own disciplines and rules is preferable to following other peoples, but I am finding I am needing to look for something else and I don’t know what else I can or would want to do. Will keep looking at your course with interest. Thanks for providing it.

    Reply
  102. Mike

    Hi Martin!

    Thanks so much for your personality test – it is uncannily accurate (at least on me). I have found your videos really fascinating so far and I am thinking of signing up for the 3-step thingy. I am just wondering about one thing – you say in your report that you are offering a low subscription price for a limited time during the initial launch of the system. But the system has been selling since 2010, so I am just a bit confused. Is this some new version of the system that you are launching? What has changed?

    Thanks again!
    Mike

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Mike

      You are this program has been established for a few years, with customers going back as far as 2008.

      However I keep adding to it and updating it.

      You need the most cutting edge system there is because recruitment practices evolve.

      What I suggest is that give a go. It comes with a money back guarantee so it is a risk free purchase. I’m pretty sure you will really like what you find.

      Thanks

      Reply
  103. Bullied

    Hi Martin!

    I have viewed the first video with interest. I was bullied by my boss at the last place of work and now I have been without a job for over a year. I have gone to interviews but I think I was not at 100% and they probably picked up on that. I really need to figure out what it is that I am good at so I can apply to the right jobs with a bit of passion!

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Thanks for sharing. I abhor bullying and yet it goes on in the workplace all the time.

      The good news is that there are some good employers out there. You just need to learn the art of job hunting in the 21 st century.

      Most of my clients thought they knew about job hunting till they took the course . I suspect you will be amazed at what you discover.

      I will show you how to land jobs. Without these skills you are doing it the hard way and playing very long odds.

      Give it a go as it comes with a money back guarantee.

      Reply
  104. Darby Hawker

    The recent webinar I found very interesting in changes to the recruitment process.

    Reply
  105. Barry

    I am intrigued by the personality observations from your brief survey. I am unemployed and in my late 50s. I am looking for roles that are similar to my past jobs because that’s what I know, but I am unable to get excited about being in this field anymore. I briefly consider every different idea/job/career that comes my way and then walk away from it – because I have no conviction what would be a better fit. Considering that finding a rewarding job follows an approach of Objectives – Strategies – Tactics, how do I get unstuck? Thanks for your thoughts.

    Reply
  106. John

    I hope you really can help with finding an income producing activity that will support my family and keep me from feeling like I’m dying. 40 this year and I can’t see how I can keep this up.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      John, in twenty minutes it will be 2013. I’m sitting with some new friends and my family.

      My final act of 2012 is to promise to help you figure out your career in 2013. I genuinely wish you the very best New Year.

      Reply
      • John

        Thank you, Martin! I’m looking forward to it. I’m diligently watching the videos that come my way and waiting for more information. All the best to you and your family as well.

        Reply
  107. Nancy

    I have listened to the first installment and…so-far-so-good. between myers-briggs, enneagram, and disc profilings, i’m interested in what additional insights you have to offer.

    Reply
  108. Randy

    I have been working in the Technology field for over 20 years and am burned-out. I am now unemployed and not sure what type of work I want to do – or would enjoy. I keep applying to Tech jobs, but I know I will be miserable when I land one. In addition, my education and age are now working against me. I could sure use some guidance.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Hi Randy, THanks for sharing. You speak for a lot of people, particularly in the tech field. I was a tech myself at one time – a very bad one. It’s good that you recognise that the same job is going to make you miserable as this now lets you focus on discovering what you should be doing with your life. It’s got little to do with experience or qualifications. Those just bind you to your past. Start with the free course and see how you get on and then if you feel like it nad there are nay places available, upgrade to the full course. Wishing you the best of luck

      Martin

      Reply
  109. mutualité libérale

    Je vous remercie pour cet article riche en informations. Bonne journée

    Reply
  110. Ana

    Hello! I have no idea what my dream job could be because I like to do a bit of everything and if I do it for too long i eventually get bored of it! Could i get help or is it pointless with confused and indecisive individuals like me? 😀

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Ana, this is just your personality and there is nothing wrong with it, despite what people may have been telling you. It’s OK if you are quickly bored, this simply means you have a much higher capacity for change and the unknown than most people.

      The trick is to find an environment where your low boredom threshold is a good thing. Work with it, not against it.

      Reply
  111. Carole

    What an interesting process. Thank you.

    As you can see, I currently have a retail business. It is a complete feast or famine existance and with trading conditions being what they are, it is a difficult ride. I do want it to succeed for lots of reasons but not necessarily with me working in it on my own all the time. I have great staff and do not want to let them down either so I am looking to do something else which I could do along side this business.

    As you rightly say, I am an ideas person and feel a little stiffled in this environment now so would love to come up with an idea which I could carry out and any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Carole

    Reply
  112. Career changer

    I don’t want to use my name obviously! I am currently working in IT documentation and before that as a translator. I have an Arts degree in languages. After 22 years in the workforce, I am bored to death and feel I am totally irrelevant in my job. I recently did a communications course and realised that I have a lot of creative, communication and problem solving skills that are being completely wasted. I am rather extroverted, quite intellectual (I would say), quick on my feet, a good talker and enjoy problem solving – I previously worked in customer service and enjoyed that. I feel my experience would allow me to aspire to some management/leadership but I feel uninspired as to a new path. How can I better research potential jobs? I do not mind taking some more training but don’t want to throw myself into that without a clear idea. I liked the initial video, it said things that were very relevant to me! I AM bored in my current job because I do have lots of ideas but my role is very restrictive and none of my ideas get listened to.So thanks for that,

    Reply
  113. Lucienne Vranch

    Hi Martin

    My big bug bare is my self confidence. I have worked in the past in different and more often than not my self confidence has let me down and I have given the job up, even though I have had very good feedback and the employers have tried their best to encourage back. What can I do about this? It is ruining my working life!

    Reply
  114. ssq

    Hi Martin

    I like what you have said, and I have too many questions, but I have to tell you briefly so you can give the right answers on that , and I am in despair of getting good advice and direction, so there it is : BA graduate in Graphic design/ Fine Arts( did medium well), Ma in Electronic media(barley passed), wanted to extend career in graphic design but I was always refused for the weakness I had in using software and not a good portfolio , so got my self in various kinds of administration, and book keeping, hated it . after ten years I tried to get involved in Physiotherapy voluntary work to get accepted to get the qualifications, got a Uni interviews and was rejected, possibly due to me being a mature student or too old for school, but with no qualifications -in which you say it is not important – . so now I am lost, I have the option of just applying to any job and keep trying till I get accepted , or go back and do intensive course( expensive in Shillington college in London in graphic design, and see from there where the sea will throw me ?? you were right I like to keep busy, and like to keep moving and using my hands, interacting…. what can you give me of advice, sinking here help me . Thank you

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Hi S,

      Thanks for sharing. On the positive side, it looks like you have an idea of what you like (Graphic design) and what you don’t like (Admin). I think it needs a bit of work however, as clarity as to what you want to do and why is the starting point to career success.

      Generally another University course and more qualifications is not usually the answer. I know many people take this approach because the universities have been mis selling the idea that new qualification = new job, but the world is full of graduates who can’t find the work they want.

      You really need Step 1 of The 3 Step System To Land Your Dream Job. Step 1 will show you exactly what direction you need to take and why. Until you figure that out you are running around in circles. Once you have this part figured out then you will have the focus required to make success a reality.

      Step 2 will show you have to get in front of the right people who can hire you and step 3 will show you how to turn every interview in to a job offer.

      But until you have Step 1 nailed down, your career will be like a pin ball game. Step 1 of the course will take you through it step by step, so you know exactly what to do and why. Have a read at the testimonials.

      Best of luck
      MArtin

      Reply
  115. sayaa

    Hi Martin,
    I have been frustrated with my career for years now. I worked for 1 year in a software company. At first it was ok for me because I wanted to learn so much and there were so many things to learn. But then after, I began to doubt my interests in this field. First, I am totally not much of a techie person and so I am not interested in what is currently happening in software and technology. Second, I found people around me to be working for money but not for passion. I did not liked the fact that people around me could be so frustrated with their job and that also influenced me. Third, I felt that working with computers would hamper my interpersonal skills. I could see so many of my co-workers rarely talked at meetings. Fourth, I felt so many of my not so talking co-workers were good in their work. There were a lot of tensions to handle and it was difficult for me to take others’ work responsibility. I became kind of frantic at times when the work pressure was huge. Looking at the interests that others had in technology, I began to doubt mine. I am more into music and understanding life and people rather than understanding what one software does or what is the next technology? Its not that I am bad at my work, its just that I dont feel this is my ideal job. So, I need to figure out what type of person I am and which career fits me. FYI, I quit my job and I am learning music now.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Hi, Thanks for sharing. You are not alone in feeling like this. It’s important to find passion for what you do. It has to have meaning. money is a poor substitute for meaning. Companies use money because they are too lazy to help you find meaning on the service you provide for them. It’s very shortsighted of them as they would achieve so much more if they provided work that had meaning.

      Reply
      • sayaa

        Dear Martin,

        I thought that the career test was a free test and that I would get an elaborate report. I just one video result of my general test. Will I be receiving other reports and test or do i need to pay for that? Thanks for the previous reply.

        Reply
  116. Andrew Walker

    Hello Martin,

    Back again after about a year to see what’s new on your site.

    When I took the three step system last time, I was lookinging for some inspiration as to occupational groups which might fit particular personality types?

    I know I chose the wrong career path when I left school, but at age 44, after two years of hell in the job market, I am back again to see if there is a tool for narrowing down my options for my personality profile?

    I took a vast ammount from the three step system, however, for all the knowledge and insight, I am still no wiser which path to take?

    Regards,

    Andrew

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Hi Andrew, Always good to hear from you. I know you have been through the process so let me ask you a couple of questions. You may need to go and think about these.

      1) What decisions did you realise you were facing?

      2) What decisions have you made since completing the 3 step system?

      I have also just added another 25 videos to the 3 step system on how to identify your ideal job. I think you should have a look at them.

      Reply
      • Drew Walker

        Hello Martin,

        Thank you for your insightful questions.

        1) I realised I was so far removed from my ideal career, both personality and indeed, spirituality.
        After 27 years, the three step system revealed, my whole identity had been based upon a persona.
        My life had become a journey dictated by others, out of necessity to earn money. I had to get back to my true identity first. I realised I had to take time out, to meditate, to heal my soul and change my whole approach.

        2) I have returned to the three step system, after reading and re building my consciousness of what’s important.
        Work is an essential part of a balanced, happy life. It’s not worth sacrificing your families or your own happiness, indeed, sanity, pursuing a career or a job you are not cut out for and makes you miserable. I learned that the hard way.

        So, I’m back again, knowing a lot more, thanks to all of your hard work in the 3SS.
        I just need to get a clear view of who I am, the real me, based upon Briggs, Myers, Jung and explore some workable career options.
        I want to build a clear picture, set some goals and rebuild my life.

        I can see you have added some new content, which I hope can bring me to a firmer foundation.
        This recession has focussed employers on getting value for money from its Human Resources, read “comodity” which I know, isn’t me.
        My value systems have changed because of the recruitment industry.
        Thank you for switching the light on.

        As soon as I get the cash together, I’m in.

        Yours sincerely
        From rock bottom.
        Drew Walker.

        Reply
  117. Jacqui

    Hi Martin, At the moment I have got myself into a rut; feeling lucky to have a job at all given the current job market, but gaining no satisfaction from the work I do. I need to gain the confidence that I deserve my dream job, more than anything else. I’m tempted by the idea of gaining more qualifications; because that would bolster my confidence. But I also want to be absolutely sure I’m going in the right direction.

    Reply
    • MartinGibbons

      Jacqui, THanks for sharing. THis is a common scenario and it is important you get satisfaction from your work. This is not an unreasonable request.

      I would guard against going for more qualifications as it is often not addressing the real issue and is a delaying tactic instead. I recommend you do a lot more ground work before you throw another year or two away at Uni.

      Reply
  118. veera

    worked for 22 years in various fields like pharmaceuticals, software, insurance & bpo but success or growth still seems to be eluding me where do I go from here currently not working

    Reply
  119. stellah

    JOB SEARCH IS BECOMING A REAL HECTIC. EMPLOYERS MAKE ADVERTISEMENT, PEOPLE APPLY ABUT NO RESPONSE COMES

    Reply
    • stellah

      Hello Martin, i would like to know which career suits me best and how to apply jobs and get invited for interviews

      Reply
      • MartinGibbons

        Stellah, You have come to the right shop at least 🙂 These are the 3 steps in the 3 step system. Sign up for the free course and then join me on the course where your answers will be found for sure.

        Reply
  120. Nayeli

    Hello l Martin, I would need your help to face an interview that I must give my best and get hired. Please provide me an easy and flexible way to get it!!! waiting for your comments. I am intending to get hired by the US Goverment into my country Mexico.Thanks,

    Reply

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